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First report of biofluorescence in Arctic snailfishes and rare occurrence of multiple fluorescent colors in a single species. (American Museum novitates, no. 3967)

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dc.contributor.author Gruber, David F.
dc.contributor.author Sparks, John S.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-18T12:56:12Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-18T12:56:12Z
dc.date.issued 2021-03-18
dc.identifier.uri http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/7257
dc.description 12 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract Biofluorescence has recently been reported to be phylogenetically widespread and phenotypically variable across bony fishes, and is most common in tropical coral reef lineages. Here we provide the first documentation of prominent biofluorescence in Arctic fishes including two juvenile specimens of Liparis gibbus (variegated snailfish) collected from the coastal waters of Eastern Greenland, as well as an adult L. tunicatus (kelp snailfish) collected in the Bering Strait off of Little Diomede Island, AK. Observations of L. gibbus were made during nighttime dives within kelp forests in iceberg habitats in Southeastern Greenland in August 2019. The juvenile L. gibbus specimens exhibit both green (523-530 nm) and red (674-678 nm) biofluorescence on discrete anatomical areas, which provides a rare example of multiple fluorescent colors emitted from a single individual. Notably, the adult L. tunicatus emitted only red fluorescence in a bilaterally symmetrical pattern of discrete red dots and blotches. Potential weak green biofluorescence was also noted in a flatfish (Hippoglossoides platessoides) collected in Greenland, but in no other Arctic species. As the distribution and function of biofluorescence in marine fishes is further examined, this report adds context to its widespread geographical and environmental distributions, and shows that, although rare, biofluorescence does occur in Arctic fish lineages. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates;no. 3967.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.5531/sd.sp.48
dc.subject Liparis gibbus -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject Liparis tunicatus -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject Bioluminescence -- Arctic regions. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Physiology -- Greenland Region. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Physiology -- Alaska -- Little Diomede Island Region. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Physiology -- Arctic regions. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Greenland Region. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Alaska -- Little Diomede Island Region. en_US
dc.subject Marine fishes -- Arctic regions. en_US
dc.subject Fishes -- Greenland Region. en_US
dc.subject Fishes -- Alaska -- Little Diomede Island Region. en_US
dc.title First report of biofluorescence in Arctic snailfishes and rare occurrence of multiple fluorescent colors in a single species. (American Museum novitates, no. 3967) en_US
dc.title.alternative Biofluorescence in Arctic snailfishes en_US
dc.type Book en_US


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  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

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