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Reassessment of a historical collection of sauropod dinosaurs from the northern Morrison Formation of Wyoming, with implications for sauropod biogeography. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 437)

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dc.contributor.author Tschopp, Emanuel.
dc.contributor.author Maidment, Susannah C. R.
dc.contributor.author Lamanna, Matt.
dc.contributor.author Norell, Mark.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-30T19:53:16Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-30T19:53:16Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-04
dc.identifier.uri http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/6968
dc.description 79 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the western United States preserves one of the best-known Mesozoic paleoecosystems worldwide. The formation crops out over an area from New Mexico and Oklahoma to Montana and Utah and encompasses a time span of approximately eight million years. Recent studies indicate a high diversity of gigantic, herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs, but the geographic and temporal distributions of species or even genera of these animals remain poorly understood. In particular, sauropod specimens from northern outcrops of the formation have rarely been studied in detail, and temporal relationships among sites are imprecise. Here, we reassess the taxonomic diversity of the sauropods from a historic Carnegie Museum locality in northern Wyoming. Previous referrals of material to the well-known diplodocid genera Apatosaurus and Diplodocus cannot be confidently confirmed; instead, all these specimens more likely represent elements from the recently recognized Galeamopus. Specimens previously assigned to Camarasaurus and Haplocanthosaurus could not be referred to these genera based on apomorphies, due to a lack of detailed knowledge concerning the genus- and species-level taxonomy of these sauropods. Our findings imply that many referrals of incomplete diplodocid skeletons to Apatosaurus and Diplodocus must be reassessed. These reassessments are particularly important with regard to specimens from northern localities of the Morrison Formation, as it is becoming increasingly evident that diplodocids from this area were distinct from better-known, more southerly taxa. This geographic segregation does not seem to apply to nondiplodocid sauropods; however, these taxa are also in need of systematic revision, which may reveal species-level patterns similar to those observed in Diplodocidae. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.relation
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History;no.437.
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.5531/sd.sp.36
dc.subject Saurischia. en_US
dc.subject Galeamopus. en_US
dc.subject Dinosaurs. en_US
dc.subject Carnegie Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.subject Kaycee Region (Wyo.) en_US
dc.subject Wyoming. en_US
dc.subject Morrison Formation. en_US
dc.title Reassessment of a historical collection of sauropod dinosaurs from the northern Morrison Formation of Wyoming, with implications for sauropod biogeography. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 437) en_US
dc.title.alternative Sauropod dinosaurs from northern Morrison Formation. en_US


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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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