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The fishes of the Amazon : distribution and biogeographical patterns, with a comprehensive list of species. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 431)

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dc.contributor.author Dagosta, Fernando C. P.
dc.contributor.author Pinna, Mário C. C. de.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-12T21:02:48Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-12T21:02:48Z
dc.date.issued 2019-06-13
dc.identifier.uri http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/6940
dc.description 163 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract We provide a general compilation of the diversity and geographical distribution of Amazonian fishes, updated to the end of 2018. Our database includes documented distributions of 4214 species (both Amazonian and from surrounding basins), compiled from published information plus original data from ichthyological collections. Our results show that the Amazon basin comprises the most diverse regional assemblage of freshwater fishes in the world, with 2716 valid species (1696 of which are endemic) representing 529 genera, 60 families, and 18 orders. These data permit a view of the diversity and distribution of Amazonian fishes on a basinwide scale, which in turn allows the identification of congruent biogeographical patterns, here defined as the overlapping distributions of two or more lineages (species or monophyletic groups). We recognize 20 distinct distributional patterns of Amazonian fishes, which are herein individually delimited, named, and diagnosed. Not all these patterns are associated with identifiable geographical barriers, and some may result from ecological constraints. All the major Amazonian subdrainages fit into more than one biogeographical pattern. This fact reveals the complex history of hydrographical basins and shows that modern basin-defined units contribute relatively little as explanatory factors for the present distributions of Amazonian fishes. An understanding of geomorphological processes and associated paleographic landscape changes provides a far better background for interpreting observed patterns. Our results are expected to provide a framework for future studies on the diversification and historical biogeography of the Amazonian aquatic biota. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.relation
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History;no.431.
dc.subject Freshwater fishes. en_US
dc.subject Fishes -- Dispersal. en_US
dc.subject Biogeomorphology. en_US
dc.subject Freshwater biodiversity. en_US
dc.subject Aquatic biodiversity. en_US
dc.subject Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.title The fishes of the Amazon : distribution and biogeographical patterns, with a comprehensive list of species. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 431) en_US
dc.title.alternative Distribution & biogeographical patterns of Amazon fishes. en_US


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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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