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The anatomy of Effigia okeeffeae (Archosauria, Suchia), theropod-like convergence, and the distribution of related taxa ; Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 302

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dc.contributor.author Nesbitt, Sterling J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-01-31T16:59:27Z
dc.date.available 2007-01-31T16:59:27Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/5840
dc.description 84 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-78). en_US
dc.description.abstract Effigia okeeffeae is named based on a well-preserved nearly complete skeleton from the Upper Triassic (?Rhaetian) "siltstone member" at Ghost Ranch, northern New Mexico. The skull is described and compared to other suchian and basal archosaurs. The maxilla and premaxilla are edentulous, and a rhamphotheca was possibly present in life. Effigia conclusively indicates that the skull of Shuvosaurus and the postcrania of "Chatterjeea" belong to the same taxon. Furthermore, the close relationship between Shuvosaurus and Effigia indicates that both taxa are nested within the suchian clade and not within Ornithomimisauria. However, the similarity in features in the skull and postcrania of Effigia and ornithomimids suggests extreme convergence occurred between the two clades. A clade containing Arizonasaurus, Bromsgroveia, Poposaurus, Sillosuchus, Shuvosaurus, and Effigia is suggested based solely on shared derived character states. Additionally, a clade (Clade Y) containing Sillosuchus, Shuvosaurus, and Effigia is well supported by further derived character states. The distribution and temporal pattern of members of Group Y suggest that members of Group Y are present in the early Middle Triassic through the latest Triassic of North America, and one member of the clade, Sillosuchus, was present in South America. en_US
dc.format.extent 12694489 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 302 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QH1 .A4 no.302 2007 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Effigia okeeffeae. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reptiles, Fossil -- New Mexico -- Abiquiu Region. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Triassic -- New Mexico -- Abiquiu Region. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- New Mexico -- Abiquiu Region. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reptiles, Fossil -- Phylogeny. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Dinosaurs -- Phylogeny. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reptiles, Fossil -- America -- Geographical distribution. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reptiles -- Evolution. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reptiles -- Dispersal -- America. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Chinle Formation. en_US
dc.title The anatomy of Effigia okeeffeae (Archosauria, Suchia), theropod-like convergence, and the distribution of related taxa ; Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 302 en_US
dc.type text en_US


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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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