Research Library | Digital Repository

On the supposed presence of Miocene Tayassuidae and Dromomerycinae (Mammalia, Cetartiodactyla) in South America. (American Museum novitates, no. 3968)

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Gasparini, Germán M.
dc.contributor.author Dutra, Rodrigo Parisi
dc.contributor.author Perini, Fernando A.
dc.contributor.author Croft, Darin A.
dc.contributor.author Cozzuol, Mario A.
dc.contributor.author Missagia, Rafaela V.
dc.contributor.author Lucas, Spencer G.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-19T13:40:39Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-19T13:40:39Z
dc.date.issued 2021-03-19
dc.identifier.uri http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/7259
dc.description 27 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract The earliest record of North American mammals in South America is significant for constraining the timing of intercontinental faunal interchange. At present, the oldest securely dated remains of a North American terrestrial mammal in South America pertain to a late Miocene procyonid; a few other North American mammal groups are present in late Miocene and early Pliocene outcrops in South America, but most are not recorded until the late Pliocene or Pleistocene, after the complete emergence of the Panamanian Isthmus. This long-established pattern has recently been called into question by reports of a proboscidean, two tayassuids, and a dromomerycine cervoid in supposed late Miocene deposits of Peruvian Amazon. In this contribution, we analyze the taxonomic identities and stratigraphic provenances of the tayassuid and dromomerycine fossils in detail. We conclude that these specimens are not distinguishable from modern tayassuids (Tayassu pecari and Dicotyles tajacu) and cervids, and that previous taxonomic identifications are based on misinterpretation of characters or inadequate specimens. In addition, there is insufficient evidence to support a late Miocene age for these terrestrial cetartiodactyl fossils; the stratigraphic provenance of the specimens is highly dubious, and the fossils are likely Quaternary in age. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates;no. 3968
dc.subject Sylvochoerus woodburnei. en_US
dc.subject Waldochoerus bassleri. en_US
dc.subject Surameryx acrensis. en_US
dc.subject Peccaries, Fossil -- Peru -- Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.subject Dromomerycinae -- Peru -- Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.subject Mammals, Fossil -- Peru -- Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.subject Mammals -- South America. en_US
dc.subject Paleontology -- Miocene -- Peru -- Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.subject Paleontology -- Peru -- Amazon River Region. en_US
dc.subject Paleontology -- South America. en_US
dc.title On the supposed presence of Miocene Tayassuidae and Dromomerycinae (Mammalia, Cetartiodactyla) in South America. (American Museum novitates, no. 3968)
dc.title.alternative Miocene Tayassuidae and Dromomerycinae en_US
dc.type Other en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

Show simple item record

Search Entire Repository

Advanced Search

Browse

My Account