Research Library | Digital Repository

Systematics and analysis of the radiation of Orthotylini plant bugs associated with callitroid conifers in Australia : description of five new genera and 32 new species (Heteroptera, Miridae, Orthotylinae). (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 422)

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Symonds, Celia L.
dc.contributor.author Cassis, G.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-22T21:56:17Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-22T21:56:17Z
dc.date.issued 2018-06-22
dc.identifier.uri http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/6900
dc.description 226 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract Orthotyline plant bugs inhabiting the southern conifer genus Callitris in Australia are investigated and classified systemically for the first time, with the description of 5 new genera and 32 new species from Australia. The five new callitroid-inhabiting Orthotylini genera proposed are Avititerra, Blattakeraia, Callitricola, Erysivena, and Ngullamiris. The 32 new species accommodated by these genera are: Avititerra lepidothrix, A. xerophila, Blattakeraia actinostrobi, B. hochuli, Callitricola ballina, C. boorabbin, C. cordylina, C. finke, C. finlayae, C. gammonensis, C. graciliphila, C. parawirra, C. pullabooka, C. silveirae, C. tatarnici, C. wiradjuri, C. wollemi, Erysivena apta, E. bundjalung, E. drepanomorpha, E. emeraldensis, E. endlicheriphila, E. kalbarri, E. majori, E. mareeba, E. molloy, E. notodytika, E. paluma, E. schuhi, E. schwartzi, E. sydneyensis, and Ngullamiris whadjuk. A key to the newly described Australian taxa, habitus photographs of all species, illustrations of male and female genitalia, and scanning electron micrographs of representative species are given. A phylogenetic analysis of these callitroid-inhabiting Orthotylini was undertaken, incorporating described Orthotylus Fieber species extralimital to Australia and other recently described Australian Orthotylini. Callitris host plants are mapped to the implied-weights phylogenetic analysis, and their associations are discussed. Associations between related species of Orthotylini and related species of Callitris were detected, as were three independent colonisations by a paraphyletic assemblage of callitroid-inhabiting Orthotylini. Generic concepts within Orthotylini are discussed, with reference to Orthotylus species extralimital to Australia and includes a comparison of key character systems. It is demonstrated that the endosomal spicule characters are primary determinants of generic limits in the Orthotylini, which are supported by other characters of the male and female genitalia and external characters. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.relation
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History;no.422.
dc.subject Orthotylini. en_US
dc.subject Cypress pines. en_US
dc.subject Cupressaceae. en_US
dc.subject Orthotylinae. en_US
dc.subject Miridae. en_US
dc.subject Host plants. en_US
dc.subject Phylogeny. en_US
dc.subject Insect-plant relationships. en_US
dc.subject Australia. en_US
dc.title Systematics and analysis of the radiation of Orthotylini plant bugs associated with callitroid conifers in Australia : description of five new genera and 32 new species (Heteroptera, Miridae, Orthotylinae). (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 422) en_US
dc.title.alternative Plant bugs associated with callitroid conifers. en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

Show simple item record

Search Entire Repository

Advanced Search

Browse

My Account