A DNA sequence-based approach to the identification of shark and ray species and its implications for global elasmobranch diversity and parasitology. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 367)

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dc.contributor.author Naylor, Gavin J. P.
dc.contributor.author Caira, J. N. (Janine Nicole), 1957-
dc.contributor.author Jensen, K. (Kirsten), 1971-
dc.contributor.author Rosana, K. A. M.
dc.contributor.author White, W. T. (William Toby), 1977-
dc.contributor.author Last, P. R.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-28T19:37:21Z
dc.date.available 2012-06-28T19:37:21Z
dc.date.issued 2012-06-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/6183
dc.description 262 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description.abstract In an effort to provide a framework for the accurate identification of elasmobranchs, driven in large part by the needs of parasitological studies, a comprehensive survey of DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial NADH2 gene was conducted for elasmobranchs collected from around the world. Analysis was based on sequences derived from 4283 specimens representing an estimated 574 (of ̃1221) species (305 sharks, 269 batoids), each represented by 1 to 176 specimens, in 157 (of 193 described) elasmobranch genera in 56 (of 57 described) families of elasmobranchs (only Hypnidae was not represented). A total of 1921 (44.9%) of the samples were represented by vouchers and/or images available in an online host specimen database (http://elasmobranchs.tapewormdb.uconn.edu). A representative sequence for each of the 574 species identified in this survey, as well as an additional 11 sequences for problematic complexes, has been deposited in GenBank. Neighbor-joining analysis of the data revealed a substantial amount of previously undocumented genetic diversity in elasmobranchs, suggesting 79 potentially new taxa (38 sharks, 41 batoids). Within-species p-distance variation in NADH2-percent sequence divergence ranged from 0 to 2.12 with a mean of 0.27; within-genus p-distance variation ranged from 0.03 to 27.01, with a mean of 10.16. These values are roughly consistent with estimates from prior studies based on barcode COI sequences for elasmobranchs and fishes. While biogeographic influences have likely shaped the diversification of the entire group, the traces left by older influences tend to be overprinted by newer ones. As a result, the most clearly interpretable influences are those associated with recently diverged taxa. Among closely related elasmobranchs, four regions appear to be of particular importance: (1) the Atlantic Ocean, (2) Arabian Sea, Persian Gulf, and Red Sea, (3) Southeast Asia, and (4) Australia. Each of these regions has a substantial proportion of taxa that are genetically distinct from their closest relatives in other regions. These results suggest that great care should be taken in establishing the identities of elasmobranch hosts in parasitological studies. Furthermore, it is likely that many existing host records require confirmation. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 367. en_US
dc.subject Sharks. en_US
dc.subject Rays (Fishes) en_US
dc.subject Genetics. en_US
dc.subject Chondrichthyes. en_US
dc.subject Parasites. en_US
dc.subject Host-parasite relationships. en_US
dc.subject Coevolution. en_US
dc.subject Nucleotide sequence. en_US
dc.subject Mitochondrial DNA. en_US
dc.subject NAD (Coenzyme) en_US
dc.subject Marine biodiversity. en_US
dc.title A DNA sequence-based approach to the identification of shark and ray species and its implications for global elasmobranch diversity and parasitology. (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 367) en_US
dc.title.alternative DNA identification of sharks and rays. en_US

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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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