Murder and martyrdom in Spanish Florida : Don Juan and the Guale uprising of 1597. (Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 95)

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dc.contributor.author Francis, J. Michael (John Michael)
dc.contributor.author Kole, Kathleen M., 1984-
dc.contributor.author Thomas, David Hurst.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-04T12:53:57Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-04T12:53:57Z
dc.date.issued 2011-08-03
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/6123
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.5531/sp.anth.0095
dc.description 154 p. : maps. en_US
dc.description.abstract In the late fall of 1597, Guale Indians murdered five Franciscan friars stationed in their territory and razed their missions to the ground. The 1597 Guale Uprising, or Juanillo's Revolt as it is often called, brought the missionization of Guale to an abrupt end and threatened Florida's new governor with the most significant crisis of his term. To date, interpretations of the uprising emphasize the primacy of a young Indian from Tolomato named Juanillo, the heir to Guale's paramount chieftaincy. According to most versions of the uprising story, Tolomato's resident friar publicly reprimanded Juanillo for practicing polygamy. In his anger, Juanillo gathered his forces and launched a series of violent assaults on all five of Guale territory's Franciscan missions, leaving all but one of the province's friars dead. Through a series of newly translated primary sources, many of which have never appeared in print, this volume presents the most comprehensive examination of the 1597 uprising and its aftermath. It seeks to move beyond the two central questions that have dominated the historiography of the uprising, namely who killed the five friars and why, neither of which can be answered with any certainty. Instead, this work aims to use the episode as the background for a detailed examination of Spanish Florida at the turn of the 17th century. Viewed collectively, these sources not only challenge current representations of the uprising, they also shed light on the complex nature of Spanish-Indian relations in early colonial Florida. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Museum of Natural History. en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 95. en_US
dc.subject Guale Indians. en_US
dc.subject Franciscans. en_US
dc.subject Missions, Catholic. en_US
dc.subject Murder. en_US
dc.subject Georgia. en_US
dc.subject Florida. en_US
dc.title Murder and martyrdom in Spanish Florida : Don Juan and the Guale uprising of 1597. (Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 95) en_US
dc.title.alternative Don Juan and the Guale uprising of 1597. en_US
dc.type Book en_US

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  • Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Anthropological Papers, published continuously since 1907, are monographic volumes that include some of the great ethnographies of the 20th century, particularly on North American Indians. Several illustrious anthropologists published their work in the Anthropological Papers, as well as many past and present curators of the AMNH Division of Anthropology. Prior to 1930, large special reports were published in the Memoirs.

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