Additional distributional records of Ambystoma laterale, A. jeffersonianum (Amphibia, Caudata) and their unisexual kleptogens in northeastern North America ; American Museum novitates, no. 3627

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dc.contributor.author Bogart, James P., 1940- en_US
dc.contributor.author Klemens, Michael W. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-18T15:01:17Z
dc.date.available 2008-09-18T15:01:17Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/5933
dc.description 58 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 24-26). en_US
dc.description.abstract Several species of mole salamanders in the genus Ambystoma are targeted by various state, provincial, and federal agencies for conservation. These salamanders have specific wetland and forested upland habitat requirements that render them vulnerable to environmental alteration. The blue-spotted salamander, Ambystoma laterale (LL) and the Jefferson salamander, A. jeffersonianum (JJ) have both been listed for protection in various parts of their ranges, but the identification of these salamanders is confusing because they often coexist with unisexual individuals that are mostly polyploid and use the sexual species as sperm donors. We used isozyme electrophoresis, blood erythrocytes, and chromosome counts in a continued effort to identify sexual and unisexual individuals in eastern North America. We examined 1377 salamanders from 118 sites in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Most Pennsylvania salamanders were A. jeffersonianum (JJ) but A. laterale (LL), previously unknown from Pennsylvania, were found in that state. The two sexual species were never found together. We found diploid (LJ), triploid (LLJ; LJJ), and tetraploid (LLLJ; LJJJ; LLJJ) unisexuals. At most collecting sites, unisexuals were more numerous than sexual individuals. The association of sexual and unisexual individuals support a kleptogenic reproductive system in which the unisexuals steal genomes from their sympatric sexual sperm donors. en_US
dc.format.extent 5670752 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates, no. 3627 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QL1 .A436 no.3627 2008 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Blue-spotted salamander en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ambystoma jeffersonianum en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ambystoma -- Reproduction. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ambystoma -- Sexual behavior. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ambystoma -- East (U.S.) -- Geographical distribution. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Salamanders -- East (U.S.) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Salamanders -- East (U.S.) -- Geographical distribution. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Amphibians -- East (U.S.) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Amphibians -- East (U.S.) -- Geographical distribution. en_US
dc.title Additional distributional records of Ambystoma laterale, A. jeffersonianum (Amphibia, Caudata) and their unisexual kleptogens in northeastern North America ; American Museum novitates, no. 3627 en_US
dc.title.alternative Distribution of Ambystoma en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

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