The lower jaws of baenid turtles. American Museum novitates ; no. 2749

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Gaffney, Eugene S. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T18:13:45Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T18:13:45Z
dc.date.issued 1982 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/5297
dc.description 10 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 9-10). en_US
dc.description.abstract "The baenid lower jaw has a well-developed processus coronoideus, no ridges or pits on the triturating surface, a relatively small dorsal opening of the fossa meckelii, and, except in Chisternon and Baena, a large splenial bone. None of these feaures is unique to baenids nor is the combination unique. Distinctly expanded triturating surfaces are found in Eubaena and Palatobaena. Chisternon and Baena are the only baenids definitely known to lack splenials; the anteroventromedial wall of the fossa meckelii is open in these genera. An associated skull and jaws of Plesiobaena putorius show that previous identification of jaws with expanded triturating surfaces as pertaining to this species was in error, the two known species of this genus have narrow jaws"--P. [1]. en_US
dc.format.extent 1691754 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, N.Y. : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates ; no. 2749 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QL1 .A436 no.2749, 1982 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Baenidae -- Anatomy. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mandible. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Jaws. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Turtles, Fossil. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Turtles -- Anatomy. en_US
dc.title The lower jaws of baenid turtles. American Museum novitates ; no. 2749 en_US
dc.title.alternative Baenid turtles en_US
dc.type text en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account