Observations on intertidal organism associations of St. Catherines Island, Georgia. 2, Morphology and distribution of Littorina irrorata (Say). American Museum novitates ; no. 2873

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dc.contributor.author Fierstien, John F. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rollins, Harold B., 1939- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T18:09:51Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T18:09:51Z
dc.date.issued 1987 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/5215
dc.description 31 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 29-31). en_US
dc.description.abstract "The marsh periwinkle Littorina irrorata (Say) occurs in a variety of Spartina marsh settings on St. Catherines Island, Georgia. Cohorts of L. irrorata were collected at four marsh localities and control grids were monitored over a three-week period. In addition, a fossil population was collected from a relict marsh mud. Each sample was subjected to detailed morphometric analysis using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate techniques. Adult size of L. irrorata is inversely related to population density and density, in turn, is directly proportional to the abundance of Spartina grass. Progenesis appears to be the adaptive strategy adopted for size decrease. Aperture shape exhibited the least variation and was relatively independent of translation rate, whorl expansion rate, aperture angle, and total width. larger apertural area was correlated with low marsh environemnts ('wetter' conditions). Total width of L. irrorata proved to be a better indicator of population structure than total height and should be used in the construction of survivorship curves for this species. The fossil population sample apparently refelcts substantially different growth dynamics, achieving adult size at fewer than six whorls. L. irrorata is a potentially useful tool for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. the species appears to exhibit limited lateral motility and has a strong distributional dependence upon Spartina grass. Monitoring cohorts of L. irrorata demonstrated a direct relationship between population density and short-term stability of population size"--P. [1]. en_US
dc.format.extent 4846227 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, N.Y. : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates ; no. 2873 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QL1 .A436 no.2873, 1987 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Littorina irrorata. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mollusks -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Spartina -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Intertidal animals -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Seashore ecology -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mollusks, Fossil -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleoecology -- Georgia -- Saint Catherines Island. en_US
dc.title Observations on intertidal organism associations of St. Catherines Island, Georgia. 2, Morphology and distribution of Littorina irrorata (Say). American Museum novitates ; no. 2873 en_US
dc.title.alternative Morphology and distribution of Littorina irrorata (Say) en_US
dc.title.alternative Intertidal organism associations en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

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