Higher-level relationships of the spider family Ctenidae (Araneae, Ctenoidea). Bulletin of the AMNH ; no. 274

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dc.contributor.author Davila, Diana Silva. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-05T22:06:27Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-05T22:06:27Z
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/441
dc.description 86 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 33-39). en_US
dc.description.abstract "A cladistic analysis based on parsimony is undertaken to test hypotheses concerning the monophyly of the ctenid spiders and the relationships among their various clades. The data matrix comprised a total of 98 species representing 16 families scored for 146 characters, with all but six taken from various morphological systems; the remaining are behavioral attributes. Ctenidae is shown to be polyphyletic as currently delimited, but the most severely questioned taxa (i.e., Acanthoctenus, Cupiennius, and Ancylometes) are indeed members of this family. The so-called ctenid eye pattern is shown to be a synapomorphy uniting a more restricted set of taxa. This clade is recognized as Ctenidae sensu stricto and it comprises at least five major lineages: Acantheinae, Acanthocteninae, Calocteninae, Cteninae, and Viridasiinae. The latter taxa are hypothesized to be the sister group of all other ctenids. In turn, a clade formed by Miturgidae s.s. and Zoridae s.s. is proposed as the sister group of Ctenidae. The cladistic analysis also refutes the monophyly of Ctenus, Anahita, Enoploctenus, Celaetycheus, and Leptoctenus. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Anahita isaloensis Ono, 1993 is transferred to Vulsor Simon, 1888; Diallomus Simon, 1897, currently placed in Zoridae, is transferred to Ctenidae; Tunabo Chamberlin, 1916 is synonymized with Neoctenus Simon, 1897; Neoctenus is removed from Zoridae and transferred to Trechaleidae; Xenoctenus Mello-Leitão, 1938 is removed from the synonymy of Tunabo and considered incertae sedis, within Ctenoidea"--P. 3. en_US
dc.format.extent 5896282 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History ; no. 274 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QH1 .A4 no.274, 2003 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ctenidae en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ctenidae -- Phylogeny. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Spiders en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Spiders -- Phylogeny. en_US
dc.title Higher-level relationships of the spider family Ctenidae (Araneae, Ctenoidea). Bulletin of the AMNH ; no. 274 en_US
dc.title.alternative Ctenid spiders en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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