Austroconops Wirth and Lee, a Lower Cretaceous genus of biting midges yet living in Western Australia : a new species, first description of the immatures and discussion of their biology and phylogeny (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae). American Museum novitates ; no. 3449

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dc.contributor.author Borkent, Art. en_US
dc.contributor.author Craig, Douglas A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T16:39:13Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T16:39:13Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/2814
dc.description 67 p. : ill., 2 maps ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Electronic version available in portable document format (PDF). en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 64-67). en_US
dc.description.abstract "The eggs and all four larval instars of Austroconops mcmillani Wirth and Lee and A. annettae Borkent, new species, are described. The pupa of A. mcmillani is also described. Life cycles and details of behavior of each life stage are reported, including feeding by the aquatic larvae on microscopic organisms in very wet soil/detritus, larval locomotion, female adult biting habits on humans and kangaroos, and male adult swarming. Austroconops annettae Borkent, new species, is attributed to the first author. Cladistic analysis shows that the two extant Austroconops Wirth and Lee species are sister species. Increasingly older fossil species of Austroconops represent increasingly earlier lineages. Among extant lineages, Austroconops is the sister group of Leptoconops Skuse, and together they form the sister group of all other Ceratopogonidae. Dasyhelea Kieffer is the sister group of Forcipomyia Meigen + Atrichopogon Kieffer, and together they form the sister group of the Ceratopogoninae. Forcipomyia has no synapomorphies and may be paraphyletic in relation to Atrichopogon. Austroconops is morphologically conservative (possesses many plesiomorphic features) in each life stage and this allows for interpretation of a number of features within Ceratopogonidae and other Culicomorpha. A new interpretation of Cretaceous fossil lineages shows that Austroconops, Leptoconops, Minyohelea Borkent, Jordanoconops Szadziewksi, Archiaustroconops Szadziewksi, and Fossileptoconops Szadziewksi form a monophyletic group. Within this assemblage Leptoconops and Minyohelea are sister groups and Austroconops and Jordanoconops are monophyletic (Austroconops is possibly paraphyletic in relation to Jordanoconops). All are considered to be members of Leptoconopinae Noè and the subfamily Austroconopinae Borkent, Wirth and Dyce is a new synonym of Leptoconopinae. Extant and fossil distributional records suggest that Austroconops was displaced from its previously broad distribution by the emergence of Culicoides Latreille. Larval feeding on microorganisms is plesiotypic within the Ceratopogonidae and Chironomoidea, and living in small aquatic habitats is plesiotypic within each family of the Culicomorpha. Outgroup comparisons further suggest that diurnal feeding by adult females is plesiotypic within the Ceratopogonidae and Chironomoidea"--P. [1]-2. en_US
dc.format.extent 4101878 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, NY : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates ; no. 3449 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QL1 .A436 no.3449, 2004 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Austroconops mcmillani. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Austroconops annettae en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Austroconops -- Larvae. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Austroconops -- Eggs. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ceratopogonidae -- Australia -- Western Australia en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ceratopogonidae -- Larvae -- Australia -- Western Australia en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ceratopogonidae -- Phylogeny. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Kangaroos -- Parasites. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Parasitic insects -- Australia -- Western Australia en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Living fossils -- Australia -- Western Australia. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ceratopogonidae, Fossil. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Cretaceous. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Insects -- Australia -- Western Australia en_US
dc.title Austroconops Wirth and Lee, a Lower Cretaceous genus of biting midges yet living in Western Australia : a new species, first description of the immatures and discussion of their biology and phylogeny (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae). American Museum novitates ; no. 3449 en_US
dc.title.alternative Biting midges from Western Australia en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

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