Skull form and the mechanics of mandibular elevation in mammals. American Museum novitates ; no. 2536

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dc.contributor.author Roberts, David C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Tattersall, Ian. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T16:36:17Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T16:36:17Z
dc.date.issued 1974 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/2739
dc.description 9 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 9). en_US
dc.description.abstract "A model of the mechanics of elevation in the mammalian mandible is described, in which rotation of the lower jaw, effected by a couple action between the anterior and posterior adductor muscle groups, takes place around the mandibular attachment of the sphenomandibular ligament. This system permits the generation of an occlusal force, variable in orientation according to the position of the bite-point along the tooth row, which is optimally absorbed by the facial skeleton. The requirements of the system are such that in long-faced forms the horizontal components of action of the masticatory muscles are emphasized, and the vertical components dominate in short-faced mammals"--P. [1]. en_US
dc.format.extent 711058 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York, N.Y. : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries American Museum novitates ; no. 2536 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mammals -- Anatomy. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mammals -- Physiology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mastication. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Skull. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mandible. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Masticatory muscles. en_US
dc.title Skull form and the mechanics of mandibular elevation in mammals. American Museum novitates ; no. 2536 en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • American Museum Novitates
    Novitates (Latin for "new acquaintances"), published continuously and numbered consecutively since 1921, are short papers that contain descriptions of new forms and reports in zoology, paleontology, and geology. New numbers are published at irregular intervals.

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