A generic revision of the Protolabidini (Mammalia, Camelidae) with a description of two new protolabidines. Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. 161, article 3

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dc.contributor.author Honey, James G. en_US
dc.contributor.author Taylor, Beryl E. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-06T15:09:30Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-06T15:09:30Z
dc.date.issued 1978 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2246/1276
dc.description p. 369-425 : ill. ; 26 cm. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 423-425). en_US
dc.description.abstract "A revised diagnosis of the Protolabidini characterizes the tribe as having a narrow rostrum and laterally expanded anterior nares. Tanymykter, new genus, possess the above derived features and is included in the Protolabidini as the primitive sister taxon to Protolabis. The morphological features that separate Tanymykter from Protolabis are all primitive except for the derived condition of closely appressed P[superscript]1[subscript]1 roots. Based upon new material from the Milk Creek Formation, morphological distinctions between Protolabis and Procamelus are clarified. The principal derived features of Protolabis coartatus that differ from Procamelus are extreme constriction of the rostrum, lateral expansion of the anterior nares, P[subscript]1 and P[subscript]2 small and sometimes absent, and a mandibular angle with extreme lateral flare and a prominent mesial tuberosity. Although the above derived features are less pronounced, they are still present in Protolabis heterodontus and other undescribed samples in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History. Thus, Stirton's species, coartatus, which has previously confused the generic concept of Procamelus, is transferred to Protolabis. The small size of the cranium and coronoid process is correlated with the strong lateral and mesial flare of the mandibular angle in P. coartatus. This reflects increased emphasis on the masseter and pterygoid muscles in mastication and less emphasis on the temporalis. In contrast, the large coronoid process in Procamelus indicates greater emphasis on the temporalis muscle. Oxydactylus exilis Matthew is transferred to Michenia because it shares the derived features of a narrow rostrum, incisiform upper canine, and a shallow symphysis. A new species, Michenia yavapaiensis, with P[subscript]1 unerupted, P[subscript]2 small, unerupted or absent, and tall-crowned molars is described from the Milk Creek Formation. Finally, a cladogram of proposed relationships of the Protolabidini is presented, including Tanymykter, new genus, Protolabis and Michenia with supporting evidence for this tribe being a monophyletic group. The relationship of other members of the Camelinae to the Protolabidini is also discussed. A short section detailing the stratigraphic framework of the Milk Creek Formation, Yavapai County, Arizona is included"--P. 371. en_US
dc.format.extent 17524858 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher New York : American Museum of Natural History en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History ; v. 161, article 3 en_US
dc.subject.lcc QH1 .A4 vol.161, art.3, 1978 en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Protolabidini. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Camelidae, Fossil -- Arizona -- Yavapai County. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Camelidae, Fossil -- West (U.S.) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mammals, Fossil -- Arizona -- Yavapai County. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mammals, Fossil -- West (U.S.) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Miocene -- Arizona -- Yavapai County. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Miocene -- West (U.S.) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- Arizona -- Yavapai County. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Paleontology -- West (U.S.) en_US
dc.title A generic revision of the Protolabidini (Mammalia, Camelidae) with a description of two new protolabidines. Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. 161, article 3 en_US
dc.type text en_US

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  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
    The Bulletin, published continuously since 1881, consists of longer monographic volumes in the field of natural sciences relating to zoology, paleontology, and geology. Current numbers are published at irregular intervals. The Bulletin was originally a place to publish short papers, while longer works appeared in the Memoirs. However, in the 1920s, the Memoirs ceased and the Bulletin series began publishing longer papers. A new series, the Novitates , published short papers describing new forms.

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